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Be careful out there

Many organisations are now changing.  With all of this re-structuring and re-organisation, have there been too many cut backs that leave companies vulnerable?

If you are in charge of an organisation, it may be worth looking at some of the Case Studies on the International Compliance Association web site.

Compliance is not witchcraft, so don’t get caught out by going down the wrong alley…

Unicorn

Photo taken at the Harry Potter Studio Tour, Leavesden Studios, Watford. 2012

 
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Posted by on August 18, 2013 in 21st century

 

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Malala

This blog was created out of inspiration and wanting to share that inspiration with others.

A wonderfully brave and inspiring young lady has been very much in my thoughts over the past month. I am sure you will have heard about her. Shahida Choudhry from Birmingham has created a petition to give Malala the Nobel Peace Prize on Change.org

Shahida describes the global movement to urge the Nobel Foundation to give Malala the Nobel Peace Prize

“On October 9, 2012, 15-year old Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman in response to her campaign against the destruction of girls schools in Pakistan. In the face of terror, Malala risked her life to speak out for the rights of girls everywhere. Malala’s bravery has sparked a global movement and we believe the Nobel Foundation should give her the Nobel Peace Prize. “

Picture from the Change.org petition by Shahida Choudhary

Picture from the Change.org petition by Shahida Choudhary

Two days ago the petition was also reported on BBC news. “Gordon Brown, the UN special envoy for education, has said Malala would be a worthy recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize “

Malala’s father, Ziauddin – who is visiting his daughter in the UK – said she wanted to convey how grateful and amazed she was that people around the world were interested in her well-being.

“Malala is recovering well, and she wants me to tell you she has been inspired, and humbled by the thousands of messages, cards and gifts. They have helped her survive and stay strong,” he said.

He has also said that she was a worthy candidate for the peace award.

“Malala stands for the human dignity, tolerance and pluralism. She has drawn with her sacred blood a clear line between barbarity and human civilisation. Her voice is the voice of the people of Pakistan and all downtrodden and deprived children of the world.”

In the UK, campaigner Shahida Choudhary said she set up the petition “because a Nobel Peace Prize for Malala will send a clear message that the world is watching”.

We are inspired by you Malala. In my mind you are clearly a worthy recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize and I am sure many more people will be signing this petition.

As Shahida has said, the world is watching.

 
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Posted by on November 11, 2012 in 21st century

 

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Education – Dr. Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

Education

Footsteps

Footsteps - image created by Maggie Baldry

Elizabeth Garrett Anderson   9 June 1836 – 17 December 1917

Dr. Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, LSA, MD, was an English physician and feminist, the first woman to gain a medical qualification in Britain. Elizabeth was the daughter of Newson Garrett, of Aldeburgh, Suffolk, where she was born in 1836. Elizabeth was educated at home and at a private school. In 1860 she resolved to study medicine, an almost unheard-of thing for a woman at that time, and regarded by some as almost indecent.

Having obtained some more or less irregular instruction at the Middlesex Hospital, London, she was refused admission as a full student both there and at many other medical schools to which she applied. Finally she studied anatomy privately at the London Hospital, and with some of the professors at the University of St Andrews, and at the Edinburgh Extra-Mural school.

She had no less difficulty in gaining a qualifying diploma to practise medicine. London University, the Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons, and many other examining bodies refused to admit her to their examinations; but in the end the Society of Apothecaries allowed her to enter for the Licence of Apothecaries’ Hall, which she obtained in 1865. This entitled her to have her name entered on the medical register, the second woman after Elizabeth Blackwell, and the first woman qualified in Britain to do so. Elizabeth Blackwell, originally born in Bristol, England, was the first female doctor in the United States and was also a women’s rights activist.

In 1866, Elizabeth Garrett was appointed general medical attendant to St Mary’s Dispensary, a London institution started to enable poor women

Dr. Elizabeth Garrett Anderson

to obtain medical help from qualified practitioners of their own sex. The dispensary soon developed into the New Hospital for Women, and there Dr Garrett worked for over twenty years. In 1870 she obtained the University of Paris degree of MD, three months after Frances Hoggan obtained that qualification. The same year she was elected to the first London School Board, at the head of the poll for Marylebone, and was also made one of the visiting physicians of the East London Hospital for Children; but the duties of these two positions she found to be incompatible with her principal work, and she soon resigned them.

In 1871 she married James George Skelton Anderson of the Orient Steamship Company, but she did not give up her practice. She had three children, Louisa, Margaret who died of meningitis, and Alan. Louisa also became a pioneering doctor of medicine and a social campaigner.

In 1873 she gained membership of the British Medical Association and remained the only woman member for 19 years, due to the Association’s vote against the admission of further women.

From 1874, Elizabeth worked steadily at the development of the New Hospital, and at the creation of the London School of Medicine for Women. Both institutions have since been handsomely and suitably housed and equipped, the New hospital in the Euston Road being worked entirely by medical women, and the schools in Hunter Street, WC1 having over 200 students, most of them preparing for the medical degree of London University (the present-day University College London), which was opened to women in 1877. In 1897 Dr Garrett Anderson was elected president of the East Anglian branch of the British Medical Association.

On 9 November 1908 she was elected mayor of Aldeburgh, the first female mayor in England.

The movement for the admission of women to the medical profession, of which Dr Anderson was the indefatigable pioneer in England, extended in her lifetime to all of North America and Europe. She died in 1917 and is buried in Aldeburgh.

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The next series of historical stories will cover ladies who were pioneers in the Entertainment industry.

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Legal Bit
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the authors.  Although great care has been taken to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the information contained in this work neither the author, contributors, employees or advisers are able to accept any legal liability for any consequential loss or damage, however caused, arising as a result of any actions taken on the basis of the information contained in this work. All third-party brands and trademarks belong to their respective owners.  Copyright : Maggie Baldry

 
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Posted by on June 28, 2011 in History, Soft Footsteps

 

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Education – Emily Davies

Education

Footsteps

Footsteps - image created by Maggie Baldry

In the nineteenth-century, Emily Davies was a pioneering campaigner for women’s rights to university access Emily, together with Barbara Bodichon, led the founding of Britain’s first women’s college, Girton College at Hitchin, Hertfordshire.

 Emily Davies
22 April 1830 – 13 July 1921

Emily Davies was an English feminist, suffragist and a pioneering campaigner for women’s rights to university access. Born in Southampton, England to an evangelical clergyman and a teacher in 1830, She spent most of her youth in Gateshead.

In 1862, after the death of her father, Davies moved to London, where she edited a feminist publication, The Englishwoman’s Journal. Davies became a founder member of a women’s discussion group, the Kensington Society.


Emily Davies

Emily Davies

Emily Davies campaigned for a woman’s right to education. She was active on the London School Board and in the Schools Inquiry Commission and was instrumental in obtaining the admission of girls to official secondary school examinations.

She then advocated for the admission of women to the Universities of London, Oxford and Cambridge. Like all universities at this time, these were exclusively male domains.

She also became involved in the Suffrage movement, which centred on a woman’s right to vote. She was involved in organizing for John Stuart Mill’s 1866 petition to the British Parliament, which was the first to ask for women’s suffrage. That same year, she also wrote the book The Higher Education of Women.

In 1869, Davies (together with Barbara Bodichon – an English educationalist, artist, and a leading early nineteenth century feminist and activist for women’s rights.) led the founding of Britain’s first women’s college, Girton College at Hitchin, Hertfordshire. In 1873, the institution moved to Cambridge, Cambridgeshire. From 1873 to 1875, Davies served as mistress of the college, where she then served as Secretary until 1904.

Girton College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, England. It was called the College for Women, and was located at Benslow House, Hitchin, a town in Hertfordshire, England. The first group of students were known as The Pioneers. In 1872 the present site, located about two and a half miles northwest of the centre of Cambridge, next to the village of Girton was purchased; the College was then renamed Girton College, and opened at the new location in October of 1873.

Over the years, many additions have considerably expanded the size of the college, most recently the award-winning library extension. Numerically and geographically, Girton is now one of the largest Colleges in Cambridge. However, the geographical separation means that the majority of people socialise within the College to a greater extent than at most other Colleges, which is said to create a distinctive, even cosy, atmosphere that is well renowned throughout the University. Girton also proudly houses an Egyptian mummy named “Hermione”, and is the only Cambridge college to have its own indoor heated swimming pool.


Girton College

Girton College

On April 27, 1948, women were admitted to full membership of the University of Cambridge, and Girton College received the status of a College of the University. However, to remember the time when women were not allowed to obtain degrees of the University of Cambridge, no gowns are worn during the college feast, when students in their final year are celebrated.

The motto of Girton College is:

Better is wisdom than weapons of war

Wisdom must have been an essential for Elizabeth Garrett Anderson when she fought for her own right (and the right for all women) to be accepted for medical training and to be admitted to the medical profession.  Elizabeth’s story is coming next in the Soft Footsteps series.

Legal bit
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the authors.  Although great care has been taken to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the information contained in this work neither the author, contributors, employees or advisers are able to accept any legal liability for any consequential loss or damage, however caused, arising as a result of any actions taken on the basis of the information contained in this work. All third-party brands and trademarks belong to their respective owners.  Copyright : Maggie Baldry

 
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Posted by on June 26, 2011 in Soft Footsteps

 

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Education – Mary Wollstonecraft – Update Link to Roberta’s blog

Education

Footsteps

Footsteps - image created by Maggie Baldry

Despite the clear successes of the pioneers of the Arts and Computing Technology at one time in the history of Planet Earth, it would have been unthinkable for a women to become involved in activities that were not defined in terms of home, family, husband and children.

There are many issues and debates surrounding female education (primary education, secondary education, tertiary education and health education in particular). These debates include gender equality and access to education, and its connection to the alleviation of poverty.

Notwithstanding that this is not a feminist blog, it is without doubt that the feminist movement has certainly promoted the importance of the issues attached to female education, discussion is wide-ranging and by no means confined to narrow terms of reference: it includes for example AIDS.

From the historical perspective, in medieval Europe, education for girls and women was at best patchy, and seen as controversial in the light of pronouncements of some religious authorities. It was also seen as stratified in the  same way as society itself.  The emphasis was on educating the daughters of the nobility for their social position to come.

Apart from Elizabeth I of England, who had a strong humanist education, which fits the pattern of education for leadership, rather than for the generality of women. Schooling for girls was rare; the assumption was still that education would be brought to the home environment. The issue of female education in the large, as emancipatory and rational human right, is broached seriously in the Enlightenment. Mary Wollstonecraft is a writer who dealt with it in those terms and we will take a brief look at her work and life later in this chapter.

Actual progress in institutional terms, for secular education of women, began in the West in the nineteenth century, with the founding of colleges offering single-sex education to young women. These appeared in the middle of the century. Once women began to graduate from institutions of higher education, there steadily developed also a stronger academic stream of schooling, and the teacher training of women in larger numbers, principally to provide primary education. Women’s access to traditionally all-male institutions took several generations to become complete.

The pioneers of equal access to education for women and men had to battle with the mind set that women did not need to be educated or were not physically capable of being educated. Mary Wollstonecraft was one of the early pioneers of the education for women. But she is not necessarily a friend to the poor; for example, in her national plan for education, she suggests that, after the age of nine, the poor be separated from the rich and taught in another school. Notwithstanding those comments a short Wikipedia based extract about her life, work and influence follows.

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Update 19 July 2011

Roberta Wedge contacted me a little while ago and left comments on this page.

Roberta has an amazing blog about Mary Wollstonecraft and I would highly recommend you check out this blog

: A Vindication of the Rights of Mary.
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Mary Wollstonecraft

 (27 April 1759 – 10 September 1797)

 Mary Wollstonecraft was a British writer, philosopher and feminist.

Mary Wollstonecraft

Mary Wollstonecraft

During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children’s book. Wollstonecraft is best known for A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), in which she argues that women are not naturally inferior to men, but appear to be only because they lack education. She suggests that both men and women should be treated as rational beings and imagines a social order founded on reason.

Among the general public and specifically among feminists, Wollstonecraft’s life has received much more attention than her writing because of her unconventional, and often tumultuous, personal relationships. After two complicated and heart-rending affairs with Henry Fuseli and Gilbert Imlay, Wollstonecraft married the philosopher William Godwin, one of the forefathers of the anarchist movement; they had one daughter, Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein. Wollstonecraft died at the age of thirty-eight due to complications from childbirth, leaving behind several unfinished manuscripts.

Today Wollstonecraft is considered to be one of the foundational feminist philosophers. Her early advocacy for women’s equality and her critiques of conventional femininity presaged the organized feminist movement. Feminist scholars and activists have often cited both her philosophical ideas and her personal life as important influences on their work.

Wollstonecraft’s work has also had an effect on feminism in recent years. Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a Muslim feminist, cited the Rights of Woman in her autobiography and wrote that she was “inspired by Mary Wollstonecraft, the pioneering feminist thinker who told women they had the same ability to reason as men did and deserved the same rights.”

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The next blog will look at the work of the campaigner for women’s rights to university access, Emily Davies.

 

Legal bit
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the authors.  Although great care has been taken to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the information contained in this work neither the author, contributors, employees or advisers are able to accept any legal liability for any consequential loss or damage, however caused, arising as a result of any actions taken on the basis of the information contained in this work. All third-party brands and trademarks belong to their respective owners.  Copyright : Maggie Baldry

 
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Posted by on June 20, 2011 in Soft Footsteps

 

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