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Stories on BBC News 1st December 2015

With the Syria Debate and Vote planned for Wednesday 2nd December,
Michael Fallon, the Conservative Defence Secretary has stated,
UK already an IS target”.

Ken Livingstone, co-chairman of Labour’s Defence Policy Review,
states “Bombing doesn’t actually win you a war”.

The Atom Bank, based in Durham, is offering App banking.
Simon Gompertz looks at the rise in popularity of App Banking.

Christmas Lights can affect your WiFi speed
and the future for BT Openreach

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Posted by on December 1, 2015 in 21st century, BBC, News

 

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Malala

This blog was created out of inspiration and wanting to share that inspiration with others.

A wonderfully brave and inspiring young lady has been very much in my thoughts over the past month. I am sure you will have heard about her. Shahida Choudhry from Birmingham has created a petition to give Malala the Nobel Peace Prize on Change.org

Shahida describes the global movement to urge the Nobel Foundation to give Malala the Nobel Peace Prize

“On October 9, 2012, 15-year old Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by a Taliban gunman in response to her campaign against the destruction of girls schools in Pakistan. In the face of terror, Malala risked her life to speak out for the rights of girls everywhere. Malala’s bravery has sparked a global movement and we believe the Nobel Foundation should give her the Nobel Peace Prize. “

Picture from the Change.org petition by Shahida Choudhary

Picture from the Change.org petition by Shahida Choudhary

Two days ago the petition was also reported on BBC news. “Gordon Brown, the UN special envoy for education, has said Malala would be a worthy recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize “

Malala’s father, Ziauddin – who is visiting his daughter in the UK – said she wanted to convey how grateful and amazed she was that people around the world were interested in her well-being.

“Malala is recovering well, and she wants me to tell you she has been inspired, and humbled by the thousands of messages, cards and gifts. They have helped her survive and stay strong,” he said.

He has also said that she was a worthy candidate for the peace award.

“Malala stands for the human dignity, tolerance and pluralism. She has drawn with her sacred blood a clear line between barbarity and human civilisation. Her voice is the voice of the people of Pakistan and all downtrodden and deprived children of the world.”

In the UK, campaigner Shahida Choudhary said she set up the petition “because a Nobel Peace Prize for Malala will send a clear message that the world is watching”.

We are inspired by you Malala. In my mind you are clearly a worthy recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize and I am sure many more people will be signing this petition.

As Shahida has said, the world is watching.

 
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Posted by on November 11, 2012 in 21st century

 

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Riots in England -v- The Wit, Wisdom and Inspiration of John Lennon

Image from Wikipedia

The media reporting of the Riots in England this week made me feel like the world was drowning in negativity. Like a drowning woman I found myself searching for something to cling to.

Everytime I picked up a paper, or tuned into the news on TV and Radio, I kept hearing the words

“All we are saying is GIVE PEACE A CHANCE
in my head.

There are many You Tube tributes to this powerful song.
This is my favourite.

If, like me, you want some more of John Lennon’s Wit, Wisdom and Inspiration,
please take a look at the John Lennon – Wikiquote page.

One of my favourites is below:-

________________

It was just a gradual development over the years.

Last year was “All You Need Is Love.” This year it’s “Give Peace a Chance.”

Remember love. The only hope for any of us is peace.

Violence begets violence. If you want to get peace, you can get it as soon as you like if we all pull together.

You’re all geniuses and you’re all beautiful.

You don’t need anybody to tell you who you are or what you are.

You are what you are.

Get out there and get peace.

Think peace, live peace, and breathe peace and you’ll get it as soon as you

like.

Okay?
______________________
John Lennon to the press on July 1969 after the release of the Plastic Ono Band’s single “Give Peace a Chance” (as quoted in The Beatles: An Oral History by David Pritchard and Alan Lysaght (1998). New York: Hyperion. ISBN: 0786864362. OCLC: 39093547. p. 285.)

Image from Wikimedia Commons – Statue of John Lennon in public park, Vedado, Havana. December 2006.

You say you want a revolution,
Well, you know, we all want to change the world…
But when you talk about destruction,
Don’t you know that you can count me out.

 
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Posted by on August 13, 2011 in 21st century, History, TaTUM

 

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The innovation of the BBC – keeping the lights on

So far the TV companies have not decided to resurrect my Grandma’s favourite programme the Good Old Days. Though considering some of the weekend offerings I wonder who will seize the opportunity to introduce a phone in programme along those lines? Vaudeville via Vodafone?

The BBC, as it stands, continues to innovate with high quality programmes. Something that the other channels just don’t seem to do.

Who would have thought of cop programmes set in the 1970s and then the 1980s.? Just look at the success of Life on Mars and Ashes to Ashes.

Currently we have the visually stunning and beautifully crafted The Hour. This amazing You Tube homage highlights the bewitching relationship between Freddie Lyon (played by the captivating and enigmatic Ben Wishaw) and Bel Rowley (played by the beautiful actress Romola Garai). Although I am too young to remember the 1950s you can get the sense of the time with all of the stunning sets, costumes and that fact that everyone seems to smoke continually.

When talking about a “sense of time” we must also consider programmes like Doctor Who, Torchwood and Being Human.

Only the BBC would be brave enough to have a TARDIS travelling through time; an immortal Captain who may now be at risk; and a werewolf (who lives with a ghost and a vampire) and who occasionally is a crew member in a Space Travel version of Titanic with Kylie Minogue <Allons-y, Alonso!>

Many businesses are facing cutbacks, I myself was made redundant last year due to “restructuring” but I am very afraid that if the BBC are cut back it will mean much more than job losses.

The commercial TV companies would never have taken a punt on a Gene Hunt.

It would be very sad if all we had were game shows and reality TV because they are the only programmes that are “cost effective”.

Hoping it won’t be a case of the last one out, turn off the lights please.

Many thanks to all of the You Tube “uploaders” and forum owners for providing the content that will show us what we are at risk of losing.

 
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Posted by on August 13, 2011 in 21st century, TaTUM

 

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Society – Lady Eve Balfour

Image from Wikipedia

Society

Lady Eve Balfour

Lady Eve Balfour (Evelyn Barbara Balfour; 1899-1990) was a British farmer, educator, organic farming pioneer, and a founding figure in the organic movement. She was one of the first women to study agriculture at a UK university, graduating from the University of Reading.

She began farming in 1920, in Haughley Green, Suffolk, England. In 1939, with her friend and neighbour Alice Debenham, she launched the Haughley Experiment, the first long-term, side-by-side scientific comparison of organic and chemical-based farming.

In 1943, she published the organics classic, The Living Soil, a book combining her research with the initial findings at Haughley. In 1946, she co-founded and became the first president of the Soil Association, an international organization promoting sustainable agriculture (and the main organic farming association in the UK today). She continued to farm, write and lecture for the rest of her life,

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Footsteps

Footsteps - image created by Maggie Baldry

Legal bit

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the authors.  Although great care has been taken to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the information contained in this work neither the author, contributors, employees or advisers are able to accept any legal liability for any consequential loss or damage, however caused, arising as a result of any actions taken on the basis of the information contained in this work. All third-party brands and trademarks belong to their respective owners.  Please note this notice is to protect the source research material. Please feel free to link and quote with references back to this page. Thank you. Copyright : Maggie Baldry

 
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Posted by on July 14, 2011 in History, Soft Footsteps

 

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Society – Kadambini Ganguly

Society

Kadambini Ganguly 1861 – 3 October 1923

Image from Wikpedia

Kadambini Ganguly was one of the first female graduates of the British Empire and the first female physician of South Asia to be trained in European medicine.

Early life
The daughter of Brahmo reformer Braja Kishore Basu, she was born at Bhagalpur, Bihar in British India. The family was from Chandsi, in Barisal which is now in Bangladesh. Her father was headmaster of Bhagalpur School. He and Abhay Charan Mallick started the movement for women’s emancipation at Bhagalpur, establishing the women’s organisation Bhagalpur Mahila Samiti in 1863, the first in India.

Kadambini started her education at Banga Mahila Vidyalaya and while at Bethune School (established by Bethune) in 1878 became the first woman to pass the University of Calcutta entrance examination. It was partly in recognition of her efforts that Bethune College first introduced FA (First Arts), and then graduation courses in 1883. She and Chandramukhi Basu became the first graduates from Bethune College, and in the process became the first female graduate in the country and in the entire British Empire.

Medical education and profession
Ganguly studied medicine at the Calcutta Medical College. In 1886, she was awarded a GBMC (Graduate of Bengal Medical College) degree, which gave her the right to practise. She thus became
the first Indian woman doctor qualified to practice western medicine. Abala Bose passed entrance in 1881 but was refused admission to the medical college and went to Madras (now Chennai) to study medicine but never graduated.

Kadambini overcame some opposition from the teaching staff, and orthodox sections of society. She went to the United Kingdom in 1892 and returned to India after qualifying as LRCP (Edinburgh), LRCS (Glasgow), and GFPS (Dublin). After working for a short period in Lady Dufferin Hospital, she started her own private practice.

Social activities
In 1883 she married the Brahmo reformer and leader of women’s emancipation Dwarka Nath Ganguly. They were actively involved in female emancipation and social movements to improve work conditions of female coal miners in eastern India.
She was one of the six female delegates to the fifth session of the Indian National Congress in 1889, and even organized the Women’s Conference in Calcutta in 1906 in the aftermath of the partition of Bengal. In 1908, she had also organized and presided over a Calcutta meeting for expressing sympathy with Satyagraha – inspired Indian laborers in Transvaal, South Africa. She formed an association to collect money with the help of fundraisers to assist the workers. In 1914 she presided over the meeting of the Sadharan Brahmo Samaj, which was held in Calcutta to honour Mahatma Gandhi during his Calcutta visit.

 The noted American historian David Kopf has written:

Ganguli’s wife, Kadambini, was appropriately enough the most accomplished and liberated Brahmo woman of her time. From all accounts, their relationship was most unusual in being founded on mutual love, sensitivity and intelligence… Mrs. Ganguli’s case was hardly typical even among the more emancipated Brahmo and Christian women in contemporary Bengali society. Her ability to rise above circumstances and to realize her potential as a human being made her a prize attraction to Sadharan Brahmos dedicated ideologically to the liberation of Bengal’s women.”

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Footsteps

Footsteps - image created by Maggie Baldry

Legal bit

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the authors.  Although great care has been taken to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the information contained in this work neither the author, contributors, employees or advisers are able to accept any legal liability for any consequential loss or damage, however caused, arising as a result of any actions taken on the basis of the information contained in this work. All third-party brands and trademarks belong to their respective owners.  Please note this notice is to protect the source research material. Please feel free to link and quote with references back to this page. Thank you. Copyright : Maggie Baldry

 
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Posted by on July 13, 2011 in History, Soft Footsteps

 

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Society – Frances Power Cobbe

Society

For our final look back at women who have inspired us throughout history let’s look at the work of an Irish animal rights activist and women’s rights’ campaigner, Frances Power Cobbe; the first female physician from South East Asia to be trained in European medicine, Kadambini Ganguly; and the first British woman to study agriculture at a UK university,  Lady Eve Balfour.

Frances Power Cobbe – December 4, 1822 – April 5, 1904

Image from Wikipedia

Frances Power Cobbe, was an Irish writer who is known today primarily as a pioneer animal rights activist.

Frances Power Cobbe is an almost forgotten nineteenth-century heroine. Born in Dublin, Ireland, Cobbe founded the Society for the Protection of Animals Liable to Vivisection (SPALV) in 1875, , the world’s first organization campaigning against animal experiments, and in 1898, the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection (BUAV), two groups that remain active today.

Cobbe was a member of the executive council of the London National Society for Women’s Suffrage and writer of editorial columns for London newspapers on suffrage, property rights for women, and opposition to vivisection.

Cobbe supported higher education for women and the reform of poor laws. Her strongest efforts were directed to alleviating violence against women, especially violence by men against their wives.

At the age of 35 she began to teach in Mary Carpenter’s school in Bristol, working with girls released from prison, inmates of work houses, prostitutes, and other unfortunates. At the same time she also campaigned against the use of live animals in scientific research. It is the latter for which she is most widely remembered.

Why is it that the women who fight “within the belly of the beast” are the first women to be forgotten?.

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Footsteps

Footsteps - image created by Maggie Baldry

Legal bit

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the authors.  Although great care has been taken to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the information contained in this work neither the author, contributors, employees or advisers are able to accept any legal liability for any consequential loss or damage, however caused, arising as a result of any actions taken on the basis of the information contained in this work. All third-party brands and trademarks belong to their respective owners.  Please note this notice is to protect the source research material. Please feel free to link and quote with references back to this page. Thank you. Copyright : Maggie Baldry

 
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Posted by on July 12, 2011 in History, Soft Footsteps

 

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